Photographs in the Driskell Center Archives

There has been a lot of progress happening in the David C. Driskell Archives recently. Our Graduate Assistant Molly has been hard at work going through one of the final series which focuses on David C. Driskell’s personal life including various journal entries, personal correspondences, and keepsakes. This is a fascinating part of the Driskell Papers and in a few weeks, Molly will be writing a post about some of the interesting things that she’s found while processing that series. In addition, I’ve been working through some of the video materials which include reel-to-reel films and VHS tapes of lectures by David C. Driskell, awards ceremonies in which he was honored, and various programs he appeared in or helped produce.  We are looking forward to having those all cataloged before the holiday season.

One of the latest activities related to the Driskell Archives has been working with Prof. Driskell in person so that he can provide information about the several thousand photographs in his collection. Though Prof. Driskell already donated and transferred some photographs to the Driskell Center, the majority of them are still held by him, and there are a lot! Our first priority is working with Prof. Driskell and his daughter Daphne Driskell-Coles to identify the thousands of photographs that will be part of the Driskell Papers collection. This past week, I went to Prof. Driskell’s home Maryland to help identify photographs and to begin the photograph inventory. I’m hoping to be able to work with them often over the next few weeks so that we can begin really working with and arranging the photos to make them available for researchers.

Sitting with Prof. Driskell was fascinating as always —for many photos that we went through together, he had a story to tell and could identify who was in the photo and when and where it was taken.

David C. Driskell at his home helping to identify photographs in his collection. David C. Driskell Center Archive. November 19, 2014.

David C. Driskell at his home helping to identify photographs in his collection. Credit: David C. Driskell Center Archive. November 19, 2014.

 

David C. Driskell working to identify photographs in his collection. Take notice of the shelf to the right--those are mostly full of photographs! Credit: David C. Driskell Center Archives. November 19, 2014.

David C. Driskell working to identify photographs in his collection. Take notice of the shelf to the right–those are mostly full of photographs! Credit: David C. Driskell Center Archives. November 19, 2014.

The acquisition of these photographs is an exciting project and we’re looking forward to delving into them more, sharing the project with you, and allowing researchers to integrate the photographs into their research on African American art!

In addition to this exciting project, I wanted to share a video that was created by the University of Maryland about the David C. Driskell Center and the great things that we do here! You can view the video here:

All of us here at the Driskell Center are wishing you and yours a very Happy Thanksgiving!

This post was written by Stephanie Maxwell, Archivist at the David C. Driskell Center Archives.

“Robert Blackburn: Passages” and the Driskell Center Library

Two weeks ago, the Driskell Center celebrated the opening of the important exhibition Robert Blackburn: Passages which is open to the public in the gallery until Friday, December 19, 2014. The opening reception was a wonderful event, welcoming guest speakers Faith Ringgold and Mel Edwards and allowing the friends of the Driskell Center to admire the works of Robert Blackburn, an artist previously unrecognized for his contribution to American art. The exhibition is wide-ranging and represents not only Robert Blackburn’s work, but also an additional thirteen works by Blackburn’s colleagues—including teachers, friends and students.

As I mentioned in my last post, there is no correspondence in the Driskell Papers between Blackburn and David C. Driskell. Though there is no display as we have traditionally done in the past for exhibitions, the research component of the Driskell Center is represented in an exciting, interactive way. Throughout the run of Robert Blackburn: Passages, visitors will be able to sit and browse through a selection of books on printmaking and Robert Blackburn, presented on a table in the center of the gallery. These books and pamphlets were pulled from the Driskell Center Library which is housed in a room within the Driskell Center office space. The display in the gallery includes two books from the Driskell Center’s Library collection including Printmaking in America: Collaborative Prints and Presses, 1960-1990, Will Barnet / Bob Blackburn: An Artistic Friendship In Relief , and two pamphlets Robert Blackburn: Master Artist – Master Painter, Detwiller Visiting Artist February 27-March 27, 1994 and Campaign for Robert Blackburn’s Printmaking Workshop. Interested visitors can leisurely browse through these books and learn more about printmaking and Robert Blackburn as an artist and mentor.

David C. Driskell Center. Catalogues and books available for viewing during the "Robert Blackburn: Passages" exhibition. Fall 2014.

David C. Driskell Center. Catalogues and books available for viewing during the “Robert Blackburn: Passages” exhibition. Fall 2014.

David C. Driskell Center Gallery. "Robert Blackburn: Passages" exhibition. Fall 2014.

David C. Driskell Center Gallery. “Robert Blackburn: Passages” exhibition. Fall 2014.

The Library’s collection of roughly 4,000 books has been collected over the course of 12 years by the Driskell Center staff and also includes selections from Prof. Driskell’s personal library as well as from Dr. Robert Steele’s personal library. This collection of resources reflects the research needs and purposes of the Driskell Center. The collection of books, exhibition catalogues, journals, and magazines focuses on African American art, American art, artists, and art history, following the mission of the Center. The Driskell Center staff has been using this collection to inform research and publicity for developing its exhibitions, collections, and scholarly events; it is a generally useful resource, which we wanted to share with our visitors as well.

Currently, our staff is working to catalog these books and make their records available and searchable to the public through our PastPerfect website. Books are cataloged under “Library” and can be found through keyword searches in the online search function here. More books are being added to the catalog every week, so continue to check back for updates! The non-circulating Library is open to researchers by appointment during office hours Monday-Friday.

Visiting the Driskell Center to see the Robert Blackburn: Passages exhibition is worth finding the time for, and we hope that you’ll come and learn a little about printmaking and the impact that Blackburn had on the art community!

This post was written by Stephanie Maxwell, Archivist at the David C. Driskell Center Archives.

Robert Blackburn and The Printmaking Workshop

Summertime at the Driskell Center, though always busy, seems to have something missing due to the empty gallery space. I always look forward to the fall semester when I get to walk past the gallery every day and see the wonderful works on display. As works on loan for the exhibition Robert Blackburn: Passages have arrived to the Center, and our intrepid staff begins hanging them, it inspired me to take a look into the Driskell Papers and see what the collection holds about Robert Blackburn and The Printmaking Workshop which he founded in New York City 1948.

Robert Blackburn was an artist in his own right, and this exhibition is the first comprehensive retrospective of his work. The exhibition will feature 100 works by Blackburn, as well as  a few additional works by his colleagues–teachers, artists, and friends.  After doing additional reading about Blackburn, it is very clear that Blackburn influenced, worked with, and helped many artists, among them Romare Bearden, Grace Hartigan, and Robert Rauschenberg.

Though there is no correspondence in the Driskell Papers between Prof. Driskell and Blackburn, Prof. Driskell did keep informational material about The Printmaking Workshop and about Blackburn himself. I found some interesting documentation including a brochure that Prof. Driskell kept about this unique and groundbreaking space created by Robert Blackburn. The brochure has some great facts and outstanding photographs (taken by Ryo Watanabe and Eric Maristany) that showcase The Printmaking Workshop and the great work that Robert Blackburn did for the art community.

Front of pamphlet on The Printmaking Workshop (undated): Box 4, Folder 15. Driskell Papers: Artists and Individuals, David C. Driskell Center Archives.

Front of pamphlet on The Printmaking Workshop (undated): Box 4, Folder 15. Driskell Papers: Artists and Individuals, David C. Driskell Center Archives.

Inside of pamphlet on The Printmaking Workshop (undated): Box 4, Folder 15. Driskell Papers: Artists and Individuals, David C. Driskell Center Archives.

Inside of pamphlet on The Printmaking Workshop (undated): Box 4, Folder 15. Driskell Papers: Artists and Individuals, David C. Driskell Center Archives.

The exhibition Robert Blackburn: Passages opens with a reception on September 18, 2015 from 5-7PM; the exhibition is open until December 19. The Driskell Center also produced a 144 page catalogue for this show which will be available for sale at the Center as well as on-line beginning September 18, 2014 (please check back here to purchase online after that date).  For more about the exhibition, please visit our website.  If you are interested in learning more about Blackburn, the Library of Congress holds the records of The Printmaking Workshop in their manuscript collection.

This post was written by Stephanie Maxwell, Archivist at the David C. Driskell Center Archives.

Summer 2014 Progress on the Driskell Papers

It’s been a while since I’ve posted to the blog, but so many things are happening here in the David C. Driskell Center Archive that it’s been hard to keep up! Here is an update on what is new in the Archives.

Over the past few weeks, we have gotten some new windows in the Driskell Center which kept us busy packing up the boxes that hold the Driskell Papers and storing them in our conference room so that they are protected from the construction. Though we still have access to the boxes, we’re hoping to get them back in the Archive in the next few weeks.

One of our Graduate Assistants, Nick Beste, has found a full time job as an Archivist in Arkansas where he’ll be processing collections for the National Park Service. We had to say goodbye to him a few weeks ago, but we know that his time at the Driskell Center prepared him for life as a professional Archivist and we wish him all the best! Before he left, though, Nick worked hard to process Series 10: Audio and Video Materials, Sub-Series 1: Audio Recordings. This sub-series includes cassette tapes, minicassettes, and audio reels that are recordings of David C. Driskell’s lectures and interviews. In the coming months, we will also be processing Series 10: Audio and Video Materials, Sub-Series 2: Video Recordings which includes VHS tapes and reel-to-reel films of interviews, lectures, colloquia, and films that have accompanied exhibitions. The potential of these materials is great and we are looking forward to delving into this sub-series more.
Though Nick has moved on, our other Graduate Assistant, Molly Campbell, has been hard at work. Since the last blog post, Molly has completely processed all of Series 2: Educator which focuses on Prof. Driskell’s life as a professor, mainly at Fisk University and the University of Maryland, though he also held adjunct and shorter-term positions at various universities around the world. This series is made up of five sub-series including: Sub-Series 1: Fisk University, Sub-Series 2: University of Maryland, Sub-Series 3: Other Institutions, Sub-Series 4: College and University Catalogs, and Sub-Series 5: Miscellaneous. These records are available on PastPerfect online and are open for research.

Another exciting project that has gained some traction this summer is the cataloging of the Driskell Center’s research library collection into PastPerfect. The Driskell Center has an extensive library of over 2,000 books, exhibition catalogues, and journals which focuses on African American art and culture and is constantly being updated. This resource is a valuable one for researchers whose interests coincide with the Driskell Center’s mission. Previously, the records of these books were kept in an Access database, available only to the Driskell Center staff. The staff has since decided to catalog them in PastPerfect, thereby making the records available online. This project is ongoing and new records will be made available through PastPerfect online each week.

As summer is getting to its peak, we are looking forward to meeting some of our processing goals and preparing for the fall which will include an Archives display accompanying the exhibition Robert Blackburn: Passages which opens on Thursday, September 18, 2014.

Look for a post in the coming weeks about some of the interesting things we are finding in the series that Molly is now working on (Series 1: Personal) and more updates!

This post was written by Stephanie Maxwell, Archivist at the David C. Driskell Center Archives.

Blueprints in the Driskell Papers

Oftentimes, the most interesting things that we come across in the Driskell Papers are things that are a little out of the ordinary. As I was processing Series 3: Exhibitions, Sub-Series 3: Curated by David C. Driskell, I came across quite a few of these unique items; my favorite among them is a blueprint from the exhibition Contemporary Visual Expressions: The Art of Sam Gilliam, Martha Jackson-Jarvis, Keith Morrison and William T. Williams. This exhibition was curated by David C. Driskell in 1987 for what was then the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum of the Smithsonian Institution, now the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum. The exhibition ran from May 27-July 31, 1987 and was the first exhibition to show in the museum’s newly renovated building which added a level of importance to the opening events and the show itself.

The exhibition focused on the work of four artists: Sam Gilliam, Martha Jackson-Jarvis, Keith Morrison, and William T. Williams and Prof. Driskell curated the exhibition keeping in mind the urban environments of the artists: Gilliam, Jackson-Jarvis, and Morrison were Washington, DC-based, and Williams was New York City-based. As Prof. Driskell wrote in his Introduction for the exhibition catalogue: “This exhibition does not present itself thematically, nor does it represent all the myriad approaches with which these individual artists experiment. But these artists represent the soul of their urban environments, Washington, D.C. and New York City, and transform events and ideas to enliven our artistic sensibilities and contribute to our own understanding and development.” (Draft of Contemporary Visual Expressions Exhibition Catalogue by David C. Driskell (ca. 1987): Box 3, Folder 6, Page 12. David C. Driskell Papers: Exhibitions – Curated by David Driskell, David C. Driskell Center Archive.) The artists’ connections with their hometowns made this exhibition all the more meaningful.

The Driskell Papers contain many correspondences between the artists and Prof. Driskell and many programs, exhibition catalogue drafts, and artist information from Contemporary Visual Expressions. What made me excited, however, was this blueprint that represents the proposed layout of the exhibition. Though the document has faded over time, you can still make out the details which include the shape and description of a spiral sculpture from Martha Jackson-Jarvis, the names and locations of some of the artwork on the walls, and details of the floor plan for this exhibition hall in the then-new building.

Photo of blueprint for "Contemporary Visual Expressions" exhibition (March 4, 1987): Box 2, Folder 12. Driskell Papers: Exhibitions - Curated by David Driskell, David C. Driskell Center Archive.

Photo of blueprint for “Contemporary Visual Expressions” exhibition (March 4, 1987): Box 2, Folder 12. Driskell Papers: Exhibitions – Curated by David Driskell, David C. Driskell Center Archive.

Detail of blueprint for "Contemporary Visual Expressions" exhibition  showing sculpture installation plan for Martha Jackson-Jarvis and planned locations for some of William T. William's artwork (March 4, 1987): Box 2, Folder 12. Driskell Papers: Exhibitions - Curated by David Driskell, David C. Driskell Center Archive.

Detail of blueprint for “Contemporary Visual Expressions” exhibition showing sculpture installation plan for Martha Jackson-Jarvis and planned locations for some of William T. William’s artwork (March 4, 1987): Box 2, Folder 12. Driskell Papers: Exhibitions – Curated by David Driskell, David C. Driskell Center Archive.

There are other blueprints in this series that delve deeper into the plans for the renovation of the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, but this particular one is the most interesting. Along with the related correspondence and project plans, this blueprint shows Prof. Driskell’s process of contemplating and presenting the works in the gallery and the artists’ and their works’ relationship to one another.

To see what else we have in the Driskell Papers about Contemporary Visual Expressions, see our PastPerfect website.

This post was written by Stephanie Maxwell, Archivist at the David C. Driskell Center Archives.

David C. Driskell and “Two Centuries of Black American Art, 1750-1950”

We have had a lot going on in the David C. Driskell Center Archives lately, but I’m particularly thrilled about one recent development: Series 3: Exhibitions is completely processed, and the records can be accessed online through our PastPerfect database! I wanted to learn more about Prof. David C. Driskell as a curator and scholar,so I decided that I would process this series myself, and I really did learn quite a bit! The series is made up of four sub-series: Sub-Series 1: Solo Exhibitions, Sub-Series 2: Group Exhibitions, Sub-Series 3: Curated by David Driskell, and Sub-Series 4: Personal Art Collection.

I found Sub-Series 3 to be the most interesting and eye-opening sub-series in this group. Organized by the exhibition title, this sub-series pulls together the records that Prof. Driskell kept on exhibitions that he curated from the early 1970s through the late 1980s, including those on the Two Centuries of Black American Art: 1750-1950 exhibition. Two Centuries was a ground-breaking exhibition curated by Prof. Driskell for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art [LACMA] in 1976 which aimed to educate the American public about the wide range and importance of African American art between 1750 and 1950. The exhibition was often billed as the first exhibition of its kind, offering American audiences a more holistic view of African American art and the contributions of African American artists to American culture. Prof. Driskell included crafts, quilts, architecture, paintings, and sculpture that had never been shown together in an exhibition before and which showed the evolution of African American art during two centuries beginning in 1750.

Of all of the exhibitions represented in this sub-series, the records on Two Centuries are the most comprehensive and detailed. They include correspondence between Prof. Driskell and the staff at LACMA on the purpose and logistics of the exhibition, correspondences with various institutions lending to the exhibition, and the research materials used by Prof. Driskell to curate the exhibition. Going through this material was fascinating: the correspondences and notes from Prof. Driskell really prove his passion for the exhibition, his attention to detail, and the difficult decisions he had to make in selecting which pieces of art include.

Though so much of the material is interesting and focuses on the organization of the exhibition, I always love seeing the reflective side of Prof. Driskell, so I wanted to share this journal entry that I found among his notes. Prof. Driskell dates the entry “June 1974-September 1976,” but it’s not clear when it was actually written.  You can read the entry below (click on the image to see it bigger):

"Some Notes Relating to the Assemblage of the Exhibition "Black American Artists, 1750-1950" for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art - June 1974-Sept 1976, Page 1" (undated): Box 11, Folder 15. David C. Driskell Papers: Exhibitions (Curated by David C. Driskell), David C. Driskell Center Archive.

“Some Notes Relating to the Assemblage of the Exhibition “Black American Artists, 1750-1950″ for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art – June 1974-Sept 1976, Page 1” (undated): Box 11, Folder 15. David C. Driskell Papers: Exhibitions (Curated by David C. Driskell), David C. Driskell Center Archive.

"Some Notes Relating to the Assemblage of the Exhibition "Black American Artists, 1750-1950" for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art - June 1974-Sept 1976, Page 2" (undated): Box 11, Folder 15. David C. Driskell Papers: Exhibitions (Curated by David C. Driskell), David C. Driskell Center Archive.

“Some Notes Relating to the Assemblage of the Exhibition “Black American Artists, 1750-1950″ for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art – June 1974-Sept 1976, Page 2” (undated): Box 11, Folder 15. David C. Driskell Papers: Exhibitions (Curated by David C. Driskell), David C. Driskell Center Archive.

"Some Notes Relating to the Assemblage of the Exhibition "Black American Artists, 1750-1950" for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art - June 1974-Sept 1976, Page 3" (undated): Box 11, Folder 15. David C. Driskell Papers: Exhibitions (Curated by David C. Driskell), David C. Driskell Center Archive.

“Some Notes Relating to the Assemblage of the Exhibition “Black American Artists, 1750-1950″ for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art – June 1974-Sept 1976, Page 3” (undated): Box 11, Folder 15. David C. Driskell Papers: Exhibitions (Curated by David C. Driskell), David C. Driskell Center Archive.

Though I love the sketches and his honesty about the project, the best part about this document is how he puts it all together in a linear way, showing the reader his own perspective and thought process on this major project. So often, I find things like this throughout the Driskell Papers, and it always reminds me how unique and personal parts of the Driskell Papers are. This is just one of many wonderful, informative documents in Series 3: Exhibitions!

Read more about another journal entry we have from David C. Driskell here and a past blog post about Series 3, Sub-Series 4: Personal Art Collection here.

This post was written by Stephanie Maxwell, Archivist at the David C. Driskell Center Archives.  

A Folder Can Be More than Just a Folder

Sometimes, the most interesting things about the Driskell Papers aren’t contained in the correspondences and catalogues that David C. Driskell kept, but rather in the containers in which he kept them. As part of our project, we are replacing the folders that Prof. Driskell had used to organize his papers with acid-free, archival quality folders. This aspect of preservation is an important part of the process as the new folders will help to maintain the quality of the paper materials held within and will prevent deterioration.  We do other preservation acts that will help to stabilize the materials like putting mylar sleeves around photographs to keep them from fading, using acid-free white paper sleeves to house fragile or damaged documents, and putting all of the folders into Hollinger boxes which are acid-free and fit the folders perfectly so as to avoid bending. On a daily basis, we perform these small actions to make a big difference to the longevity of the papers.

Many of the folders that Prof. Driskell kept have folder titles, helping us to accurately know what is contained within, and many also have writings, scribblings, and notes on them. Molly Campbell, one of our Graduate Assistants, brought to my attention such a folder as she was pre-processing the sub-series on Prof. Driskell’s time at Fisk University. Prof. Driskell titled the folder “Carl Van Vec” which we can infer has to do with the Carl Van Vechten Gallery at Fisk University. The folder contains some articles about exhibitions at the Carl Van Vechten Gallery as well as some appraisals done for works in the gallery, and correspondences on behalf of the gallery. But what is most unique is the original folder that held these materials: 

"Carl Van Vec" Folder with Packing List (undated): Folder T-183-149. David C. Driskell Papers: Educator, David C. Driskell Center Archive.

“Carl Van Vec” Folder with Packing List (undated): Folder T-183-149. David C. Driskell Papers: Educator, David C. Driskell Center Archive.

 

The list on the front of this folder seems to be a packing list for a trip Prof. Driskell took to Jerusalem. We don’t have records of the exact dates of the trip, but we believe that it was in the fall of 1973. This list includes the necessities of travel like toiletries and a passport, but also some of the more individual things like the journal paper he carried with him and slides of his recent work, which allow us to piece together his motives and preparation for the trip. Looking at the way someone organizes not only their papers, but themselves can tell you a lot about a person. So much of what is in the Driskell Papers focuses on Prof. Driskell’s life as an educator, curator, artist, and scholar, but strewn among that are these glimpses into his personal life, as trivial as they may seem.

Because of the unique nature of this folder, it will be placed into a white paper folder kept with the materials it originally held and then placed into the new, acid-free folder. Keeping these materials together is important in the archival world, allowing for researchers to see the material as the owner once used it. Folders with writings on them can be found throughout the Driskell Papers, adding another layer of meaning to this already rich collection. 

This post was written by Stephanie Maxwell, Archivist at the David C. Driskell Center Archives.